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Chapter News - November 01, 2014

Wounded Warrior Hunt 2014

Wounded Warrior Hunt 2014

Date: Saturday, November 01, 2014

WOUNDED WARRIOR HUNT QUEENSTOWN LODGE, EAST BRADY, PA The vets awaiting their pheasant hunt at Queenstown Lodge near East Brady. Article By: Jasmine Carlson, sophomore at Ridgway High School – Photo by Dave Nesbitt This past March the East Brady American Legion along with Rosebud Mining and Pheasants Forever put on a three day pheasant hunt for members of the Wounded Warrior Project at Queenstown’s Hunting Reserve. This project helps thousands of injured warriors returning home from the current conflicts and provided assistance to their families. The last few years Pheasant Forever Chapter 630 volunteered their time and trained dogs to hunt alongside participating veterans. This year, nine strong and respectful men came to the hunt. I was selected for my third year to run my two dogs, Gabby, a Brittney Spaniel and Teddi, a German Shorthair Pointer. Attending one of these events is life changing. The men and the dog handlers are treated to breakfast, lunch and dinner cooked by many of the American Legion volunteers. When I arrived I was also treated with a belly busting breakfast. While I was eating I heard how much the men loved the lodge. I also got to meet all of the men and hear some of their tragic stories. At 8:00AM it was time to hunt. I was paired with two honorable men, both of them were eager to be introduced to my dogs and ready to hunt. As soon as we hit the field my dogs both went on point! To make sure we were successful, I explained to the vets how my dogs will flush and retrieve the bird. They got behind the dogs and ‘bam!’ we have our first pheasant! We continued to hunt and shot several more birds. The longer we hunted the more we bonded. Through this experience I had the opportunity to hear an honorable man’s story. The vet told me that he was badly injured by an IED. An IED is a homemade bomb constructed and deployed in ways other than in conventional military action. The IED exploded on the side of the road causing him to have to recover from a coma that lasted 2 month and now has to deal with the pain throughout his spine and back. Through my experience I learned that freedom is not free and more people need to give back to our vets who are honorable and heroic.